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Righteous Indignation—the Root of Prayer and Salvation

Posted on | December 18, 2013 | By Rabbi Dovid Schwartz | 4 Comments

Shemos 5774-An installment in the series

From the Waters of the Shiloah: Plumbing the Depths of the Izhbitzer School
For series introduction CLICK
By Rabbi Dovid Schwartz-Mara D’Asra Cong Sfard of Midwood

Blessed is Elokim, who has not removed my prayer, or His loving-kindness from me.

-Tehillim 66:20

The Izhbitzer taught that before the Divine Will to liberate is at hand a person remains blind, deaf and dumb to his own need for deliverance. The person cannot see his deficiencies and has no idea as to what he is lacking. However, once there is a Divine Will to liberate, It allows the one in need of deliverance to see the root cause of his deficiencies and proffers him the capacity to pray and cry-out for salvation.  Next, the one in need of deliverance begins to bluster and create a prayerful ruckus to HaShem. Then, HaShem shines his chessed- loving-kindness and the actual salvation transpires.

This is what the psalmist, King Dovid, meant when he wrote said “ … who has not removed my prayer, nor His loving-kindness from me.”  Even though the prayer is “mine” it is HaShem who implants the desire to utter it in my heart, He could remove it — but He chooses not to.

A long time then passed and the king of Egypt died. The children-of-Israel groaned (due to) [from] their slavery and they cried out; and their supplications ascended to G-d from [amidst] the slavery.

-Shemos 2:23

If one wanted to create a timeline charting the Geulah-salvation from Galus Mitzrayim-the Egyptian exile, the split second of this collective national groan would be the starting point of the timeline.  Before that moment they had no impetus, no drive to pray and call out to G-d. When the Divine Will decreed that the time for Geulah had come, HaShem stimulated their desire to be extricated from Galus and the will to pray for this salvation.  For the naissance of every salvation is the desire for salvation.

The Izhbitzer’s elder son, the Bais Yaakov, develops this concept further: The period of nocturnal darkness that is most intense and most concealing is the one directly preceding the dawning of the light. Our sages refer to this as קדרותא דצפרא–the starless morning gloom, and use it as a metaphor for the intensification of Jewish suffering. “A man and his young son were wandering on the seemingly interminable road and the boy began despairing of ever returning to civilization. ‘Father’ he asked ‘Where is the city?’ The man responded ‘Son, when we pass a graveyard that will be the sure sign that a city is not far off.‘  Similarly the prophet told K’lal Yisrael–the Jewish People ‘If you are swamped by travails you will be redeemed immediately — HaShem will respond on the day of your suffering’ ” (Yalkut Shimoni Tehillim 20:580)

When the new king ramped up the sadistic slave-labor he had overplayed his hand.  Somehow, the human capacity for adaptation to trying circumstances had allowed K’lal Yisrael to endure the slavery up until that point. They had grown inured and insensitive to the agonies and the indignities that their taskmasters heaped upon them.  But when the oppression intensified they finally sensed their own innate freedom and free men cannot tolerate being enslaved. They felt the pain and suffering of their slavery and began to sniff the sweet aroma of liberation. When it hurts, one groans and screams; ויזעקו   –“and they cried out.”

It wasn’t so much that the liberation was a response to the crying out, as the crying out was a reaction to the liberation process that had begun internally. By implementing the Geulah from the inside out it was, in fact, HaShem who gave them the drive to cry out.  This is the meaning of the pasuk “HaShem, You have heard the yearning of the humble: You will prime their heart, Your Ear will be attentive” (Tehillim10:17).  Once the human heart is primed for prayer that is the sure sign that the Divine Ear has already been attentive to the distress and taken the initial steps towards ending it. HaShem develops Geulah gradually until it is actualized. It begins with the end of endurance of Galus and the capacity to feel the pain, progresses to hope and the conviction that HaShem can help, flowers into crying out in prayer and culminates in the actual Geulah.

The Bais Yaakov adds an etymological insight: two nearly synonymous words in lashon kodesh-the holy tongue mean “to cry out”, זעקה-zeakah (beginning with the letter zayin) andצעקה  -tzeakah (beginning with the letter tzadee). Tzeakah is the verb employed when things are hopeless and the path to salvation is completely obscured. As that pasuk says “This case is identical to a man rising up against his neighbor and murdering him. After all, she was assaulted in the field, even if the betrothed girl had cried out (צעקה beginning with a tzadee) there would have been no one to come to her aid and save her (literally: she would have had no savior.)” (Devarim 22:26, 27)

Whereas zeakah is the verb employed when things are no longer hopeless and the salvation begins to become palpable. This type of “crying out” takes place when, sensing the possibility of salvation, one begins marshalling and concentrating all of his faculties towards the achievement of this goal, evoking a corresponding Divine response.  At its root the verb zeakah means to coalesce and band together as in וַיֹּאמֶר הַמֶּלֶךְ אֶל-עֲמָשָׂא, הַזְעֶק-לִי אֶת-אִישׁ-יְהוּדָה שְׁלֹשֶׁת יָמִים; וְאַתָּה, פֹּה עֲמֹד “And the king said to Amasha: muster the men of Judah together for me within three days, and you be present here.”  It is this latter verb that connotes hope and faith in the salvation, which our pasuk uses to describe the crying-out; וַיֵּאָנְחוּ בְנֵי-יִשְׂרָאֵל מִן-הָעֲבֹדָה, וַיִּזְעָקוּ - The children-of-Israel groaned due to their slavery and they cried out.

The first of the four famous expressions of Geulah (Shemos 6:6) is typically translated as “and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians.” But the first Gerrer Rebbe, the Chidushei haRi”m  reads it in a way that resonates with the Izhbitzer’s  fixing the split second of this collective national groan as the starting point of the Geulah from Galus Mitzrayim. The Ri”m renders the first expression of Geulah as “and I will extricate you from your patience (savlanus), from your capacity to bear it [Galus Mitzrayim] anymore” for the redemptive process cannot begin as long as the exile can be tolerated.  Only after the Bnei Yisrael can no longer bear it and are disgusted by it, can the Galus be liquidated.  Getting in touch with their inner freeman, they must first grow furiously offended about the affront to their dignity — the insult, more than the injury, of slavery.

Hashem doesn’t take the slaves out of slavery until he takes the slavery out of the slaves.

Adapted from:

Mei Hashiloach II Shemos D”H Vayeanchu
Bais Yaakov Shemos inyan29 D”H Vayeanchu page 29 (15A)
and inyan 30 D”H Vayeanchu page 30 (15B)

Comments

4 Responses to “Righteous Indignation—the Root of Prayer and Salvation”

  1. Bob Miller
    December 19th, 2013 @ 10:39 am

    Is this saying that a Divine prompt of some sort is necessary for a Jew or group of Jews to begin teshuvah? If so, are those who have not been prompted for some reason less responsible for their actions? Or is there really an accessible prompt on some level for everyone at every current level of sensitivity?

  2. Rabbi Dovid Schwartz
    December 19th, 2013 @ 12:12 pm

    Is this saying that a Divine prompt of some sort is necessary for a Jew or group of Jews to begin teshuvah?

    Although the focus of this dvar Torah was the exile / redemption dynamic not the sin/ repentance dynamic there are strong parallels between the two . Moreover for our current exile our sages have taught “Yisrael will not be redeemed other than through repentance.” So it would seem as though a prompt from on-High is needed.

    Without overtly telegraphing my “mussar” the contemporary relevance of this vort is this: when are Jews in our current , comparatively livable and comfortable exile going to get in touch with their inner freeman/ Jew? When are we going to realize that we are slaves to contemporary cultural mores; slaves to fashion; slaves to careers? Even in the friendly confines of Boro Park and Lakewood we are slaves to galloping materialism and food-fetishism. When are we going to groan and shout “I’m mad as hell and I can’t take it any more”?

    OTOH in a broader, non-Izhbitzer sense there are very few Jews who have sinned so badly that “the gates of repentance have been locked before them” so there must be an accessible prompt on some level for everyone at every current level of sensitivity.

    Rav Dessler z”l called this the bechira-free will point

  3. SoMeHoW Frum
    December 21st, 2013 @ 10:07 pm

    The words Zeaka and Tzeaka seem interchangeable earlier in the Parsha of Sedom. See Pasuk 20 and 21 of Perek 18. Onkelos translates both words using the same Aramaic Shoresh of KVL.

  4. Rabbi Dovid Schwartz
    December 21st, 2013 @ 11:28 pm

    OTC. i find those pesukim consistent with the Izhbitzer approach. Pasuk 20 discusses teh sin of sedom, presumably wehere there is the sin their is possibility for teshuvah. geulah/ pasuk 21, per chazal, refers to the murdered girl whom no one would help….אין מושיע לה exactly like Devarim 22:26, 27.

    Full disclosure: In HaKarmel, a lexicon based in the works of the Malbim the the entry under זעק-צעק define the difference as one of degree, not of kind. zeaka being the smaller , less urgent of the two.
    http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=32825&st=&pgnum=244&hilite=

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